Saturday, 21 February 2015

Two Golden Honeycomb Wash Cloth Patterns

Honeycomb Wash Cloth - Susan Elizabeth
 Honeycomb Wash Cloth - Susan Elizabeth
Over the last couple of weeks, as I mentioned in an earlier post, I have been in a bit of a wash cloth knitting frenzy. (Fifteen cloths in two weeks to be precise)  I don't know why, exactly,  but I do know that there is something uniquely satisfying about these quick projects.  Start and stop within a day.  No seams.  Two ends to quickly weave in, and Ta Dah!  project finished.   Not to mention trying out a different pattern  and colour each time.   Dish cloths are the crack cocaine of knitting.   Trust me,  once you start, it is pretty hard to kick the habit.  Or, at least I think it would be hard to kick the habit;   I haven't tried to quit yet.

In fact, I have come up with my own patterns to throw into the mix of the thousands of dish cloth, face cloth, spa cloth and wash cloth patterns.      The name thing drives me crazy.  Dish cloth vs Face cloth?  "Dish cloth" sounds so domestic (and I happen to use a brush to clean my dishes).  Face cloth  says nothing about your hands or any other body parts, and yet I am sure all body parts should be included.  "Spa cloth" sounds almost elite, and yet, I am not really sure what exactly that name refers to.  So, in the interest of my own sanity, these are Wash Cloths.  Do with them what you wish.
Purlwise Honeycomb Wash Cloth - Susan Elizabeth
Purlwise Honeycomb Wash Cloth - Susan Elizabeth


Purlwise Golden Honeycomb Wash Cloth: This is a large, thick and squooshy cloth.  It  has a rich and luxurious   feel, and  is highly textured, perfect for pampering yourself.

Materials:   1  50 gram ball of Worsted Weight Cotton.     I used Bernat Handicrafter Cotton.
Needles:  5.5mm US 9 needles,  tapestry needle.  This is a very dense stitch.  If you use smaller needles your cloth becomes a nice pot holder.
Pattern:   Slip Stitch Honeycomb  Stitch
Gauge:  10 stitches per 2 inches.
Finished Size:  approx 8 x 8 inches
Notes:  The first stitch of each row is slipped knitwise. with yarn in back.  The last stitch of each row is purled.     Honeycomb Pattern stitches are slipped purlwise with yarn in back.

Instructions:
Loosely cast on 41 stitches.
Row 1 (rs):  Slip 1 (knitwise), knit 39 purl 1.
Row 2 (ws): Slip 1 (knitwise), (knit 1 slip 1)* repeat to last  2 stitches,  knit 1 purl 1.
Row 3 (rs):  Slip 1 (knitwise), knit 39 purl 1.
Row 4 (ws): Slip 1 (knitwise), knit 1, (knit 1, slip 1)* repeat to last 3 stitches, knit 2, purl 1.
Repeat these 4 rows until your cloth is square,  approx 8 inches.
Cast off.
Weave in ends.
Backside of Purlwise Honeycomb Wash Cloth - Susan Elizabeth
 Backside of Purlwise Honeycomb Wash Cloth - Susan Elizabeth
After I made two of the Purlwise version, I decided to try slipping the slip stitches Knitwise,  and the result is much different.
Knitwise Honeycomb Wash Cloth - Susan Elizabeth


Knitwise Golden Honeycomb Wash Cloth: This is a large, honey comb patterned cloth.  It  has a rich and luxurious   feel, and  is highly textured, perfect for pampering yourself.

Materials:   1  50 gram ball of Worsted Weight Cotton.     I used Bernat Handicrafter Cotton.
Needles:  5.5mm US 9 needles,  tapestry needle.  This is a very dense stitch.  If you use smaller needles your cloth becomes a nice pot holder.
Pattern:   Slip Stitch Honeycomb  Stitch
Gauge:  10 stitches per 2 inches.
Finished Size:  approx 8 x 8 inches
Notes:  The first stitch of each row is slipped knitwise. with yarn in back.  The last stitch of each row is purled.     Honeycomb Pattern stitches are slipped knitwise with yarn in back.

Instructions:
Loosely cast on 41 stitches.
Row 1 (rs):  Slip 1 (knitwise), knit 39 purl 1.
Row 2 (ws): Slip 1 (knitwise), (knit 1 slip 1)* repeat to last  2 stitches,  knit 1 purl 1.
Row 3 (rs):  Slip 1 (knitwise), knit 39 purl 1.
Row 4 (ws): Slip 1 (knitwise), knit 1, (knit 1, slip 1)* repeat to last 3 stitches, knit 2, purl 1.
Repeat these 4 rows until your cloth is square,  approx 8 inches.
Cast off.
Weave in ends.


You might be wondering why there needs to be two patterns for this wash cloth.  Good question.  I didn't think there would be such a difference in results just because of the way the slipped stitches were slipped.    Purlwise slipping makes a thicker stretchier fabric, while  knitwise slipped stitches have a bit more structure, and more open honeycomb  holes and looks more delicate with pretty little holes in the honeycomb.    At this point I can't decide which way I like better.   I suggest you try them both and decide for yourself.  Consider it a knitting taste test.

Front of Knitwise Honeycomb Wash Cloth - Susan Elizabeth
I hope you enjoy knitting some HoneyComb Wash Cloths as much as I did.    I also hope it helps you to think of the bees and actively try to help them.   There is lots of information available on what to do to save the bees.  What we need is also lots of ACTION.



Blessings,
~ Feather ~

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